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Yakiniku - Korean or Japanese?

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J1N
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Yakiniku - Korean or Japanese?

Post by J1N » Sep 17th, '06, 04:50

obviously yakiniku is a japanese term, but i'm confused as to whether it's japanese barbecue, or korean barbecue. i've seen them translated both ways. is there anyone who can clear this up for me?

Thuan
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Post by Thuan » Sep 17th, '06, 04:56

Korean barbecue.

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rickt
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Post by rickt » Sep 22nd, '06, 16:53

WHAT? no way!! Yakiniku is a Japanese type of barbecue. the word Yakiniku is made up of two words in Japanese: yaki which can mean barbecue, and niku which means meat. I'm not sure what's the Korean word for barbecue.. maybe something like bulgogi or some sort... or is bulgogi a marinated meat..? hmm... whatever.. :whistling:

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JadedAngel
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Post by JadedAngel » Sep 22nd, '06, 16:56

I always thought that it was Japanese....but hey, what do I know? :whistling:

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chsaf
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Post by chsaf » Sep 22nd, '06, 17:04

ummm... there's a "yakiniku" in every culture! lol!

japanese, korean, chinese, malay, american, u name it.

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Psygnius
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Post by Psygnius » Sep 22nd, '06, 18:03

The way the Japanese eat Yakiniku is Korean style. Even though it's called Yakiniku, the English name for the way Japanese people eat it is Korean barbeque. So it's really Korean, we even call it Korean in English, but the word is Japanese.

Oh yeah, make sure you wear dirty clothes when you go eat, since your hamper room will smell like yakiniku and smoke until the next time you wash your clothes. Might as well ruin the dirty clothes instead.

mimmi
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Post by mimmi » Sep 23rd, '06, 05:43

Psygnius wrote:The way the Japanese eat Yakiniku is Korean style. Even though it's called Yakiniku, the English name for the way Japanese people eat it is Korean barbeque. So it's really Korean, we even call it Korean in English, but the word is Japanese.

Oh yeah, make sure you wear dirty clothes when you go eat, since your hamper room will smell like yakiniku and smoke until the next time you wash your clothes. Might as well ruin the dirty clothes instead.
:lol good advise, I'll remember that the next time I go out for B-BQ....I always thought too that it's a Korean b-bq with a japanese name, but yeah what do I know :lol....

gameday
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Post by gameday » Dec 21st, '06, 13:37

In my town we have at least 5 different yakiniku places, and they are split down the middle whether they are more Korean style or Japanese style. It depends on the place. It's all delicious, though, so who cares?

raiseplus
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Re: Yakiniku - Korean or Japanese?

Post by raiseplus » Nov 5th, '08, 04:07

J1N wrote:obviously yakiniku is a japanese term, but i'm confused as to whether it's japanese barbecue, or korean barbecue. i've seen them translated both ways. is there anyone who can clear this up for me?
the word yaki-niku came from korean word BUL-GOGI.

bul - fire

gogi - meat

yaki- fire
niku- mmeat. get it? they just translated it straight to japanese


thats why whenever u go to japan they go " i want to go to korea to eat yakiniku because i want to eat the original, from the base home." in japan they still use the word bulgogi galbi

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groink
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Post by groink » Nov 5th, '08, 04:23

In Hawaii, the style of each yakiniku joint will tell you if it is Japanese or Korean. From what I've observed, all the Korean BBQs refer to themselves as yakiniku, probably so that the Japanese tourists will recognize the term and know what to expect or to go if they're craving for that style of food.

As for the way these places operate... Again, this is from what I've seen in Hawaii. All the Korean BBQs grill on what I refer to as hubcaps on propane because the cooking surface really does look like hubcaps you'd see on a 1970s era vehicle. And, there are only a few number of slits that allow the flame to penetrate and touch the food. The Japanese BBQs, however use charcoal grills with a wire mesh on top. The good thing about the charcoal grills is that the meat does not boil itself to death like they do on the hubcaps or when you cook meat on a Chinese wok. The food under charcoal also cooks a lot quicker, and with an outdoor barbeque like flavor. And (again, this is in Hawaii), at the Japanese yakiniku places, you do not have to take three showers after leaving the place.

Image
A few cuts made on this hubcap, and you're on your way to BBQ'ing!!!!! Fighting!!!

The Korean BBQs are almost always buffet style. They're also always a flat price per person - all you can eat. The food at a Japanese BBQs are on a per-order basis, and it comes out to be much more expensive.

--- groink

LostOne.TR
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Post by LostOne.TR » Nov 5th, '08, 05:28

It's often used interchangeably, as Groink pointed out, so I wouldn't outright say "yaikiniku" is/isn't korean bbq. It just means bbq'd meat. I wouldn't take it for more than that.

If you want to differentiate in terms of the food... you could look at yakiniku as the Japanese take on "korean bbq." Attributing things like the sauces used for dipping. However since at times it's used interchangeably, it's best to check for each case of its use- or you might be getting a different meal than expected.

Yaki doesn't really mean fire.

jholic
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Post by jholic » Nov 5th, '08, 06:05

here's the wikipedia explanation:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yakiniku


being from hawaii myself, i have similar views to groink. the term is used interchangeably, but just from my experience, if you mention 'yakiniku' to someone in hawaii, most of the time, they will think about korean bbq.

personally, i love korean yakiniku BECAUSE of the buffet-style. my appetite (and wallet) has not allowed me to sample the japanese version yet. but i have absolutely no problem with the smell on clothes later. heck, it just makes me want to go right back!! :lol

joolee
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Post by joolee » Dec 3rd, '08, 01:44

"And, there are only a few number of slits that allow the flame to penetrate and touch the food. The Japanese BBQs, however use charcoal grills with a wire mesh on top."

I don't know which places you've been, but real Korean barbecues (not the ones you do at home) use grilled mesh with charcoals.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korean_barbecue

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groink
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Post by groink » Dec 3rd, '08, 06:02

joolee wrote:"And, there are only a few number of slits that allow the flame to penetrate and touch the food. The Japanese BBQs, however use charcoal grills with a wire mesh on top."

I don't know which places you've been, but real Korean barbecues (not the ones you do at home) use grilled mesh with charcoals.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korean_barbecue
Read what I wrote... I said HAWAII. You created an account just to write the above? What a waste...

--- groink

kaasbris
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Post by kaasbris » Dec 9th, '08, 17:22

AFAIK, Japanese cuisine didn't have any sort of BBQ-style meat until 20th century. I am sure Korean "Bul-go-gi"or "Kal-bi" was transfered to Japan as "Yakiniku" by Koreans.

Still in Japan, yakiniku is not considered traditional, as everyone knows it's rather foreign - Korean.

However, many "Bul-go-gi" and "Kal-bi" restaurants have transformed into Japanese style in Japan, and tastes a little different. Well, there are still many "tranditional" Korean restaurants who are popular in Japan as well.

I doubt if any Japanese claim yakiniku is Japanese cuisine at this time, as it's too early and it's not so different from original - still delicious though. Well, but some day in the future, with enough time and effort, they could claim it.

noobee
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Post by noobee » Dec 9th, '08, 17:52

yakiniku is Japanese Language

but both Japanese and korean has different kind of yakiniku

SfumatoPants
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Post by SfumatoPants » Dec 9th, '08, 18:29

Althgough both styles cook the meat on a grill, or metal cooking disk, the way the meat is prepared differs between the two cultures. In Japan Yakiniku refers to the Japanese taste of the meat and Korean style prepared meat will be refered to as "Korean Style Yakiniku". Korean meat preparation is, but not limited to, heavy marinating in a sauce that may or may not contain chili. Japanese meat preparation methods usually involve a dry rub of salt, pepper, and light oil. This is a generalization, but is meant to demostrate the differences in style.

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groink
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Post by groink » Dec 9th, '08, 20:42

I mean, really, who cares about what culture invented yakiniku or kalbi. It is almost like saying that X-culture invented fire, and also invented the idea of cooking animal flesh, while the rest of the world was eating raw meat. I can imagine a bunch of cave men creating a circle around a fire, while cooking dinosaur meat on a stick. The only thing missing there was the sauce. I don't think these hairy dudes were Japanese or Koreans.

The argument is almost as bad as fighting over a fishing island, or a body of water...

--- groink

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groink
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Post by groink » Dec 9th, '08, 21:09

SfumatoPants wrote:Korean meat preparation is, but not limited to, heavy marinating in a sauce that may or may not contain chili. Japanese meat preparation methods usually involve a dry rub of salt, pepper, and light oil. This is a generalization, but is meant to demonstrate the differences in style.
Interesting. I'll buy that idea! Because Japan is an island nation, there were very little animals walking about the grounds, such as cows, pigs, rabbits, etc. The Japanese diet prior to the Meiji Restoration was mostly vegetation, fish and egg (tamago).

The Koreans, on the other hand, have been eating beef and pork and many other things on four legs for centuries. The thing about the chili peppers... The reason why spices was such an important trading commodity during trading between Europe and Asia is that these spices were used to make the meat more edible, since there was no refrigeration. If you killed a cow, you wanted the beef to last for weeks. It would be a waste to kill the animal for a family of four, eat only an eight of the animal, and have the rest rot on you by the next day. Not only did the spices help the meat last longer, but when the meat did actually start to rot and smell, the spices basically drowned out the taste and smell of the rotting flesh. That is basically why you don't see the Japanese marinating anything or using spices to preserve meat; they didn't have the need to preserve anything, since they basically caught or bought enough fish for that day's meal.

But today, with refrigeration, we don't have the rotting meat problem. But the spices and marinating in Korean cuisine continue to be used. Therefore, I would give credit to the Koreans for introducing the spices and other sauces to the overall barbecue process. But as for the rest of the event - huddling around a fire and cooking meat while getting drunk from booze - anyone could've come up with that idea.

--- groink

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