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Let's learn Japanese....

Talk about the culture and entertainment from Nihon.
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emrams
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Post by emrams » May 16th, '07, 04:30

Hello...

Ok, my friend of 6 years who lives in Japan has a birthday coming up. I want to call her place and talk to her, but I wanted to be able to say a few things in Japanese because her parents don't understand or speak English at all. So I wanted to say something like

Good morning, would Ayumi be home by any chance?

Which is something I would say normally to my friends parents if they were to pick up. So would anyone be able to translate that for me so I don't sound like a complete idiot when I call and they don't understand what I'm saying?

Thanks so much

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KurosakiKaien
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Post by KurosakiKaien » May 16th, '07, 05:41

"Ohayou gozaimasu, Ayumi-san wa irasshaimasen ka?"

Would be the proper keigo I believe, when is her birthday? I'll have to double check the proper keigo, but I think that's right. And I assume you already know how to say "Happy Birthday" ;)

*edit*

I've changed irasshaimasu to the negative masen ka, to be more polite. It almost literally translates to "Good morning, would Ayumi-san be there?" rather than "is Ayumi-san there"?

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emrams
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Post by emrams » May 16th, '07, 05:49

Her birthday is in June, so it's not like it's tomorrow or anything, so I'm not in a rush. Thanks so much for helping out. Yeah I know how to say Happy Birthday but I won't be saying that in Japanese because she is fluent in English and would probably think it's weird and would laugh at me if I talked to her in Japanese. I just wanted something simple and polite for if her parents picked up the phone since I have never met them and they don't get English at all. They are like "Ayumi? (blahblahblah in Japanese) Ayumi... Ah..... Ayumi!" Thanks so much for telling me this useful info!

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KurosakiKaien
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Post by KurosakiKaien » May 16th, '07, 05:55

No problem, you're more than welcome. If you need anything feel free to ask here, or PM me, always good to help a fellow Canadian out hehe.

Also, just in case you're unfamiliar (though I'm sure you're not):

If they respond with something along the lines of "imasen", "dekakemashita", "inai", "deta".
Those would mean she's not there, or has gone out. Though the latter two won't probable be used, since they're quite casual.

Oh, thought of something else, "imasen", or "inai" might also be limited to specific households.. that response might only be used if you dialed the wrong number... :pale: :pale:

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emrams
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Post by emrams » May 16th, '07, 06:06

Well thanks for that. I really appreciate it. I think I will be ok since she will be expecting my call on that day, if she's not there I will go for her cell. Thanks, if I have any more questions I will ask you! :wub:

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Le_Muse
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Post by Le_Muse » May 17th, '07, 04:07

emrams wrote:Hello...

Ok, my friend of 6 years who lives in Japan has a birthday coming up. I want to call her place and talk to her, but I wanted to be able to say a few things in Japanese because her parents don't understand or speak English at all. So I wanted to say something like

Good morning, would Ayumi be home by any chance?

Which is something I would say normally to my friends parents if they were to pick up. So would anyone be able to translate that for me so I don't sound like a complete idiot when I call and they don't understand what I'm saying?

Thanks so much
Hey there!
I just want to let you know that the nicest thing to do for her parents is to also let them know who you are before asking for Ayumi. It is just considered a common courtesy.
I would suggest:

"Ohayoo Gozaimasu" (i usually use "moshi moshi" when on the phone)
To ensure that you have not called the wrong number right off the bat, I would also suggest that you double check and make sure that this is the right household. If you know Ayumi's last name, I would highly suggest this little question right after saying hello.
"*Family Name* no otaku desuka?" which means is this the *Last Name* residence?
If you hear an "iie" then you missdialed or have the wrong number. Apologize by saying "sumimasen" and then hang up.
However you should hear a "Hai soo desu" which means: yes, it is.
So follow it with:
"Watashi wa *Name* desu ga, Ayumi wa ira shaimasuka?" which means This is *name*, is Ayumi at home?

Situation #1: If you have called the right house and she is at home then you should hear a "hai chotto matte kudasai" which means, yes. please wait a moment.

Situation #2: Now...if you hear a reply that sounds like " iie "...and then something ending with " -imasen " or " -naidesu " then she is not at home so just reply with an
"Aa, soo desu ka? arigatoo gozaimasu. shitsuree shimasu. " and hang up. This basically means: Is that so? Thank you very much. Goodbye.

I wish I could explain how to properly pronounce all of the above but you should be fine if you get the gist of Japanese drama dialogue ^_~.
<3

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Linh[hyd=3]
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Post by Linh[hyd=3] » May 18th, '07, 18:27

こんばんは みなさん !!

おげんきですか ?
わたしは リネ です

はじめまして !!

(hahaa)

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BxLibra
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Post by BxLibra » May 18th, '07, 19:16

Linh[hyd=3] wrote:こんばんは みなさん !!

おげんきですか ?
わたしは リネ です

はじめまして !!

(hahaa)
はじめまして。元気ですよ!あなたも?

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Le_Muse
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Post by Le_Muse » May 18th, '07, 19:33

こんにちは リネさん!      (konnichiwa Linh-san!)
私の なまえは リサです。 (watashi no namae wa Lisa desu.)
どうぞ よろ しく。      (douzo yoro shiku.)
元気です。ありがとう。リネさんは。(genki desu. Arigatou. Linh-san wa?)

"Good Afternoon Linh!
My name is Lisa.
Very nice to meet you.
I am good, thanks. And yourself?"


I threw in some kanji above to those who are able to read the Japanese script.
私 means わたし (watashi) or " I, myself "
元気 means げんき (genki) or " good, lively, well "

I believe the hardest part with the Japanese language is the memorization that is required especially with the kanji. The average person in Japan has to be able to read at least around 2 thousand kanji in order to be what is considered a "proficient reader". I only know at this point a little over a hundred....that is a long way to go.

The other difficult task is the conjugation of Japanese verbs. In the English language, we only conjugate our verbs maybe 3 times at the most to reference to the past, present, and future, (Example: I have walked, I am walking, I will walk).

However the Japanese version of conjugating verbs is much more complex. They take into account, past, present, future, polite, plain, negative, affirmative, memory, ability to, etc....there are so many ways to conjugate! (although once you understand the rules...it does get easier)
Luckily speaking the language is actually quite easy in comparison to the English language, since we have more sounds and vowels. The language as far as speech goes, is very repetitive and there are little surprises since the language tends to be extremely direct. You just have to watch out of how you are talking to a person as far as formal or informal. It is a very polite language system ^_^
<3

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F4
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Post by F4 » May 19th, '07, 18:09

thanks all 4 ur help

what does that mean?

Ohisashiburi?
Sashiburi! Hitori?
Mochiron = i gues it means ofcourse but wanna double check (:
Wo Ai Ni = i guess it is smthing related to love wanna to know the exact meaning

Arigatou Gosaimasu

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Riee109
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Post by Riee109 » May 19th, '07, 20:40

F4 wrote:thanks all 4 ur help

what does that mean?

Ohisashiburi?
Sashiburi! Hitori?
Mochiron = i gues it means ofcourse but wanna double check (:
Wo Ai Ni = i guess it is smthing related to love wanna to know the exact meaning

Arigatou Gosaimasu
Ohisashiburi = "Long Time Not Seen!"
Sashiburi! Hitori? = "Long Time Not Seen! Are you alone?" (informal)
Mochiron = "of course"
Wo ai ni ->That is Chinese and means "I love you"

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F4
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Post by F4 » May 19th, '07, 22:13

Riee109 wrote:
F4 wrote:thanks all 4 ur help

what does that mean?

Ohisashiburi?
Sashiburi! Hitori?
Mochiron = i gues it means ofcourse but wanna double check (:
Wo Ai Ni = i guess it is smthing related to love wanna to know the exact meaning

Arigatou Gosaimasu
Ohisashiburi = "Long Time Not Seen!"
Sashiburi! Hitori? = "Long Time Not Seen! Are you alone?" (informal)
Mochiron = "of course"
Wo ai ni ->That is Chinese and means "I love you"
Riee arigatou Gosaimsu :salut:

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NiNjA25
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Post by NiNjA25 » Jun 3rd, '07, 07:21

I have a question...

How do u use wa... and ga?

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DMPA
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Post by DMPA » Jun 3rd, '07, 07:35

NiNjA25 wrote:I have a question...

How do u use wa... and ga?
ha is a subjest particle, so you woud put it infront of the thing you're talking about.
ex. watashi wa....(which is by the way written as 'ha')
um, i will leave the explanations for ga to the profesionals lol

hope i didn't confuse anyone, or wrote the wrong info XD

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GoddessCarlie
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Post by GoddessCarlie » Jun 3rd, '07, 08:08

It's really confusing for a non-native japanese speaker, but they say that it takes time. So, in time you'll just naturally know what to use where.

Wa is a topic marker
Ga is the subject marker.

Have a look at this article It's very good - clear and easy to understand.

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BxLibra
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Post by BxLibra » Jun 3rd, '07, 09:25

The particle は (wa) serves two functions:
(A) contrastive - "at least"
(B) marks what has been already introduced in the conversation -
"as for N," "speaking of N"
and
Unlike は (wa), が (ga) indicates new information in the context. "It is N that is..."; "It is N who does..."

to put it more simply... hope that helps a bit




source: professor at MIT

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NiNjA25
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Post by NiNjA25 » Jun 4th, '07, 06:46

Now I understand... thank you minna for all ur help...

by the way...

Im Jannina
Im 14 y/o from the Philippines...

Yoroshiku Onegai shimasu!

1aco
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Post by 1aco » Jun 5th, '07, 23:53

This is great site if you really wanne learn Japanese..

http://www.nihongoresources.com/

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Dreamfall
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Post by Dreamfall » Jun 7th, '07, 20:31

Recently I've started learning kanji....kiyoku kanji .There were two ways of reading kanji.When should I use On or Kun reading of kanji?

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ruisu
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Post by ruisu » Jun 7th, '07, 20:51

Unfortunately there are at least two ways to read most kanji...usually you will use the On reading when reading a compound word (two or more kanji characters)

The Kun reading is the native Japanese meaning...and you use it with an isolated Kanji.

As with everything I'm seeing in nihongo, these rules are just generalizations...and there will be a lot of exceptions that you will have to memorize too.

Here's an example from my book:

水 - Water - On reading: sui / Kun: mizu
力 - Power - On reading: ryoku / Kun: chikara

すいりょく = 水力 -hydaulic power/water power (you can't read this as mizuchikara [out loud at least! but you'll know what it means even if you can't say it])

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Dreamfall
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Post by Dreamfall » Jun 8th, '07, 13:55

So...If I got it right...when two or more kanji characters are written together like that,then I read it ON...But when kanji stands alone....then what???

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ruisu
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Post by ruisu » Jun 8th, '07, 13:58

Then you use the Kun'yomi =)

Unless there isn't one :wink:

水 - mizu
力 - chikara
水力 -suiryoku

Hmm..check out this link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kanji#When ... ch_reading
It gives some common exceptions like letter and love.

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Dreamfall
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Post by Dreamfall » Jun 8th, '07, 14:24

domou arigatou ruisu-san!

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F4
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Post by F4 » Jun 10th, '07, 20:17

can i know what does this sentence means?

会えてうれしい

thanks in advance ... plz write it in romanji

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ruisu
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Post by ruisu » Jun 10th, '07, 20:32

I've never seen 会う look like that before...but I think it's saying something like:
[whoever] would be happy, if [whoever] met [whoever]

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F4
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Post by F4 » Jun 10th, '07, 20:49

ruisu wrote:I've never seen 会う look like that before...but I think it's saying something like:
[whoever] would be happy, if [whoever] met [whoever]
well i tried to use a website that translate Japanese to english and it says:

Being able to meet, it is delightful something like that ... what do you think ruisu san? :unsure:

anyway thanks for your help,, i appreciate it

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ruisu
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Post by ruisu » Jun 10th, '07, 20:54

EHhh...sorry I should have kept my mouth shut. I'm only 3 months into Japanese. :unsure:

I think this is the romaji: ae te ureshii

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Post by zenitse » Jun 10th, '07, 22:14

It's aete ureshii and I would translate it as "I am glad I was able to meet you". aeru is potential form of au and means "be able to meet", aete is derived from that and -te form is used here for stating reason.

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Dreamfall
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Post by Dreamfall » Jun 11th, '07, 07:55

What means ONGAKU...I know that gaku means study...but how this should be translated?

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ruisu
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Post by ruisu » Jun 11th, '07, 13:41

Ongaku means music. It's using a different kanji than the one your thinking about.
ongaku: 音 - Music
gaku: 学 - learning
benkyou - 勉強 - study

When you add suru, the word for "to do" you get:
benkyou shimasu 勉強します - to study [there's a better translation for this...but I can't express it :-( ... really benkyou-suru is "to study"]

fomrs of suru - I think the basic ones to learn first are formal present and formal past. And later the te-form :salut:
Last edited by ruisu on Jun 12th, '07, 16:07, edited 2 times in total.

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foshio88
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hellooo

Post by foshio88 » Jun 11th, '07, 14:00

wahh hajimete kono forum wa mite...

hmmm i think suru its a normal form or its call jisho form?
jisho means dictionary..

means shimasu(masu form/polite form)=suru(dic form/normal form)

ruisuchan, is that right?^___^ :mrgreen:

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ruisu
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Post by ruisu » Jun 12th, '07, 16:04

Right, suru is the dictionary form. It's one of the special verbs, and the books I'm using teach it early on. I think a) because "to do" is really necessary to know in any language, and b) because it can be attached to hundreds of nouns (things) to make new verbs =)

So, if you already know some nouns you can double that vocabulary by learning how to use it with suru!

Benkyou is an example of that, but I think a clearer one is marriage:

Marraige (kekkon) is a thing, but when you attach suru to it it becomes an action/state of being.

kekkon - marriage
kekkon-suru - to marry
kekkon-shimasu - to be married [*]
kekkonshimashita - got married [*]

[*] Feel free to make corrections, I'm still having trouble going back and fourth between Japanese and English.

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Post by BxLibra » Jun 12th, '07, 19:54

ruisu wrote: kekkon - marriage
kekkon-suru - to marry
kekkon-shimasu - to be married [*]
kekkonshimashita - got married [*]

[*] Feel free to make corrections, I'm still having trouble going back and fourth between Japanese and English.

kekkon shimasu = to get married (its the same as kekkon suru) since shimasu is the polite form of the "dictionary" form (suru) (in other words suru becomes shimasu when "conjugated"). So kekkon suru = kekkon shimasu (they mean the same thing.. They are both "to get married."
Last edited by BxLibra on Jun 12th, '07, 19:59, edited 1 time in total.

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ruisu
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Post by ruisu » Jun 12th, '07, 19:58

Ahh...thank you BxLibra! And, kekkon-shiteimasu would be "getting married" like in the act of getting married?

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Post by BxLibra » Jun 12th, '07, 20:07

ruisu wrote:Ahh...thank you BxLibra! And, kekkon-shiteimasu would be "getting married" like in the act of getting married?
actually kekkon shite imasu means "is married" like 私はけっこんしています。 "i am married"

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Post by ruisu » Jun 12th, '07, 20:22

Oh...man Japanese is hard! I'm going to lay off the te-form for a while, because it isn't computing in my brain :-(

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Post by BxLibra » Jun 12th, '07, 20:26

ruisu wrote:Oh...man Japanese is hard! I'm going to lay off the te-form for a while, because it isn't computing in my brain :-(
i know it takes me forever sometimes i make mistakes with the ~te form and my japanese friends would like laugh and be like huh that doesn't make sense lol but its ok it takes time i guess i'm still a beginner so i figure in about a year or so more i'll be able to use te form w/o any mistakes lol
それじゃ。。。頑張ります!!!! :P

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Post by ruisu » Jun 12th, '07, 20:33

頑張っています!!Lol...did I use it correctly???

(I'm trying my best)
Last edited by ruisu on Jun 12th, '07, 20:39, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by BxLibra » Jun 12th, '07, 20:37

ruisu wrote:頑張っています!!Lol...did I use it correctly???
yep! its correct lol

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Post by F4 » Jun 13th, '07, 02:28

ruisu wrote:EHhh...sorry I should have kept my mouth shut. I'm only 3 months into Japanese. :unsure:

I think this is the romaji: ae te ureshii
Thanks my dear you did help :salut:

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Post by ruisu » Jun 13th, '07, 02:29

uso!

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requiem
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Post by requiem » Jun 14th, '07, 05:00

Random advanced (or I'd like to think so) question here.

I've learned in my years of study that women use "wa" in casual speech to lighten the tone or the mood.

For example:

"Yokatta wa ne?" - That's great./I'm glad [to hear that].
versus "Yokatta!" which is "That's wonderful!"

It also adds a hint of femininity since the sound has a "nya" cuteness added into it.

However, in recent conversation with my Japanese friend he used "wa" in a phrase (which I couldn't understand anyway - silly me). I proceeded to tease him for talking like a girl, when he threw his head back in laughter thinking how stupid I must be. Apparently, if men choose to speak in an upward inflection, the phrase becomes "masculinized." I have never heard of this before, but I choose not to argue with a native speaker, lol.

Could someone explain it to me (whilst picking on my ignorance if necessary) ^_^;; I would ask my teacher, but she's well...not here.

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Post by momoflower » Jun 14th, '07, 05:45

requiem wrote:However, in recent conversation with my Japanese friend he used "wa" in a phrase (which I couldn't understand anyway - silly me). I proceeded to tease him for talking like a girl, when he threw his head back in laughter thinking how stupid I must be. Apparently, if men choose to speak in an upward inflection, the phrase becomes "masculinized." I have never heard of this before, but I choose not to argue with a native speaker, lol.

Could someone explain it to me (whilst picking on my ignorance if necessary) ^_^;; I would ask my teacher, but she's well...not here.
Yeah, I remember learning a year or two ago that wa with a falling intonation is feminine and wa with a rising intonation is the masculine form. We practiced it in class and the guys definitely had to be careful not to sound feminine. Not sure exactly why that is, but sometimes tone is definitely a key difference in speech between males and females.

And I just wrote a paper with a couple people about lexical gender differences in informal Japanese for a linguistics class.

Anyway... I hope I helped in some way?

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Post by quashlo » Jun 14th, '07, 06:02

^ In normal dialect, yes, わ is used mainly by women. But it's also commonly used (I guess originally/more frequently in the Kansai region) by men to add a little bit of emphasis, kind of like よ in standard Japanese.

momoflower is right about a tone difference, but I believe it's the other way around. When women say it in standard dialect, it's usually flat or rising in tone, as in よかったわね, よかったわ, etc. When men use it, the tone goes down... Just imagine Matsumoto-san saying もうあかんわ! ( = もう駄目だ!) and maybe that will help you see what I mean... :lol

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Post by momoflower » Jun 14th, '07, 07:20

quashlo wrote:^ In normal dialect, yes, わ is used mainly by women. But it's also commonly used (I guess originally/more frequently in the Kansai region) by men to add a little bit of emphasis, kind of like よ in standard Japanese.

momoflower is right about a tone difference, but I believe it's the other way around. When women say it in standard dialect, it's usually flat or rising in tone, as in よかったわね, よかったわ, etc. When men use it, the tone goes down... Just imagine Matsumoto-san saying もうあかんわ! ( = もう駄目だ!) and maybe that will help you see what I mean... :lol
Yeah... I meant to say the other way. ^^v

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Post by BxLibra » Jun 14th, '07, 11:32

i guess you could also say its somewhat like when girls try to sound cute and they drop the わ in 私(わたし) like they just say あたし cause it sounds more "cuter" ね? i could be wrong but i really know i hear japanese girls say it like that also as well as the よかったわね。

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Post by requiem » Jun 14th, '07, 15:37

BxLibra wrote:i guess you could also say its somewhat like when girls try to sound cute and they drop the わ in 私(わたし) like they just say あたし cause it sounds more "cuter" ね? i could be wrong but i really know i hear japanese girls say it like that also as well as the よかったわね。
I actually sat in on a Japanese college level lecture (they spoke entirely in Japanese, and I understood maybe 2% of it...lol)...but the lecture concerned gender equivalents in sounds in language.

Girls in America do relatively the same thing with English, as women do in Japanese.
In America, when a guy says " That's so cool!" he might add words like "Dude" and "heh," etc. Also, guys tend to broaden their vowels keeping the sound more distinct and in low pitch.
However, women tend to spread their lips wide, brightening the vowel to give it a gentle, flamboyant effect. Furthermore, it's more feminine to say "Aww, that's so cool" or "Hee hee."
Of course these gender boundaries are crossed daily by most English speakers, but these applications are relatively similar in all languages.

A "masculine" sound usually has a broadening of the lips vertically, hence why men in Japan trying to be cool say "-nei" instead of "-nai" (The infamous Kimura Takuya saying "shiranei yo!" remains quite the table discussion between Japanese from what I've heard)...the sound of "nei" requires a slight raising of the soft palate and a bit less of a nasal pronunciation, which is more complacent with female speaking.
Women in Japanese are literally all nasal. I recall walking through a Tokyo subway station, and hearing this tiny, skinny Japanese female gate guard say "Chiketto kudasai! Arigatou gozaimaaaaasu" in such a sharp, whiny manner that I thought I'd kill her. (Not that I don't find it cute, but that sometimes it gets so excessive that your eardrums dissipate.) Like American women they widen their lips, giving the bright, distinctness of sound from a male voice (Japanese women saying "hai" is probably the most feminine thing I've ever heard.)

Again I'm certain these gender boundaries are crossed in Japan, too, but I wouldn't know.

Therefore, in the case of 私 and あたし, I speculate that since "wa" requires one to lose the quality of femininity by thinning the lips for the movement of "w," saying "a" alone gives off the same sound without losing that quality.

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Post by gs56cb » Jun 14th, '07, 17:33

I have a good website for learning japanese. It's caled japaneselearning.com. Check it out

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ruisu
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Post by ruisu » Jun 15th, '07, 04:49

Actually (you guys may be right too but) the わたし / あたし thing is really just formal vs informal.

See here and here.

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requiem
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Post by requiem » Jun 16th, '07, 04:37

ruisu wrote:Actually (you guys may be right too but) the わたし / あたし thing is really just formal vs informal.

See here and here.
Very true...I was just explaining in regards to transformations of words that come from gender in language.

I might even be wrong - I was listening to a conversation on this in Japanese I could barely understand (and had what I couldn't understand translated by someone who often used weak English expressions). Therefore, this is the conclusion I gathered, pieced together by my notes...

Concerning the websites, I wonder why boku is considered informal. Most Japanese that I've spoken to explained that it is a proper word for young men. Unless you're talking to someone with significantly higher status, then using boku 僕 is entirely appropriate.

Here's an interesting article concerning usages of self-addressing.

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Post by hamanokumko1212 » Jun 18th, '07, 03:30

Eeto, nihongo o sukoshi hanashimasu.
Watashi wa Keideru desu. Ju-yonsai desu.
Kinoo, watashi wa nihongo no konsaato ni ikimashita. AMA ni ikimashita.
Tanoshikatta desu! Soshite, kinoo watashi wa UNICORN TABLE no konsaato wo mimashita.
Anata wa? Kinoo nani o shimashita ka?

(I'm posting because I don't have anyone else but my sensei to talk to in Japanese D:
and, can someone tell me if my grammar was correct on tanoshikatta? kthx.)

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Ore.Sama
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Post by Ore.Sama » Jun 18th, '07, 09:45

hamanokumko1212 Welcome ^^...
ii na!! Konsaato wa >_< yokatta janie ka!?

And as far as i know tanoshikatta is correct :unsure:

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Post by Romance » Jun 18th, '07, 10:06

haha you are cute, study on

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kurosaki_frank
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Post by kurosaki_frank » Jun 18th, '07, 10:28

im also studying japanese!
so it would be nice to have a penpal

but right now i have to go cuz im also studying economy lol
so brb later

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Post by o0glad2bbiba0o » Jun 18th, '07, 12:13

i used to study japanese too. coz i wanted to study in japan after college. but i got so engrossed in some things so i stopped studying. now that ive already graduated from college, i want to start learning again! weeeee! wish me luck, everyone! :w00t:

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BxLibra
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Post by BxLibra » Jun 18th, '07, 13:26

If you all are looking for great people to talk to in Japanese. There is a site www.sharedtalk.com its a great site to meet people from around the world and learn new languages especially Japanese. There are a lot of people from Japan wanting to learn english on this site and you can not just text chat with them but also voice chat and its a great way to practice your japanese as well as help them with their english ね~

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Post by bluenvision » Jun 18th, '07, 16:55

Thanks for the link, BxLibra. I was looking for sth like this :3

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BxLibra
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Post by BxLibra » Jun 18th, '07, 20:45

no problem ^.^....yall may also want to download skype at www.skype.com (its free if another person also has skype) its a chat and calling system and there are a lot of people on sharedtalk that also use this as a form of chating and voice chatting for practice its another way besides sharedtalk that i keep in touch with my japanese friends and penpals

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albertoavena
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Post by albertoavena » Jun 19th, '07, 01:06

Kind of a dumb question and probably has been answered but, why in japanese writing (especially online), do they add a w at the end?

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ruisu
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Post by ruisu » Jun 19th, '07, 01:47

Don't think I've seen that before...got a link?

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albertoavena
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Post by albertoavena » Jun 19th, '07, 01:55

Well not really a link, I mostly see this in japanese forums.
Here are some examples I've seen:

"飲むとネイティブじゃないのが明らかになる罠w"

"俺ぁまだ19歳やで。いっっぱい飲まんとな!www "

"俺がこないだ泊まってたネットカフェーはな、(俺んちから歩いて10分ぐらいちゅうより、十三駅前んとこやねんwww "

"皆忙しいと思うけれど、時間があれば一緒に酔っ払う経験ができたらと思いますww "

I see this constantly but not sure why. Why w?

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Post by quashlo » Jun 19th, '07, 01:58

w = warau = 笑う = to laugh
I guess it's the equivalent of "lol" :lol

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albertoavena
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Post by albertoavena » Jun 19th, '07, 02:02

Oh really? Thanks a lot! I've been trying to figure it out for the longest time! I always see it and have always been curious about it. So it's an equivalent to "lol", huh? Interesting...
Never would guess it would be 笑う。。。

Thanks again! :-)

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Post by NanaTorigawa » Jun 21st, '07, 01:19

Hajimemashite
Watashi wa Rhiannon desu
15sai desu.
amerikajin desu.
eigo to chotto nihongo o hanashimasu
manga ya anime ya nihon no ongaku ya dorama nado ga suki desu
douzo yoroshiku onegaishimasu

I'm taking japanese as my elective in school and i have already taken a year of it... i'm hoping to teach and learn more.

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Dreamfall
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Post by Dreamfall » Jun 23rd, '07, 14:50

Hi...long time nos see...as usualy to ask for help...
Ok...I like translated lyrics...but didn't find translation for Gackt's new song:

Kodoku ni obieta
Tsuki wa sora wo dakishimenagara
namida de mienai anata wo sagashite sakenda

Anata no hitomi ni utsuru watashi wa waratteita
mou nidoto aeru hohoemi no mae ni
kurayami sakebitsudzukeru anata ga mieru
dou sugite

kowareru hodo watashi wo tsuyoku dakishimete
mou ichido aenu nara yume no naka de ii
towa no nemuri wo kudasai

kowareru hodo watashi wo tsuyoku dakishimete
yume kara samete wa kieru anata no egao wo
itoshisugiru sono koe mo
mou ichido aeru kara yakusoku shita kara
afureru hodo no ai de yasashiku tsutsunde
towa no nemuri wo kudasai

anata ga mienai
anata ga mienai 


Something I CAN understand ...but can't understand whole sentences...Anyone?

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Post by zenitse » Jun 23rd, '07, 15:30

Dreamfall wrote:Hi...long time nos see...as usualy to ask for help...
Ok...I like translated lyrics...but didn't find translation for Gackt's new song:

Kodoku ni obieta
Tsuki wa sora wo dakishimenagara
namida de mienai anata wo sagashite sakenda

Anata no hitomi ni utsuru watashi wa waratteita
mou nidoto aeru hohoemi no mae ni
kurayami sakebitsudzukeru anata ga mieru
dou sugite

kowareru hodo watashi wo tsuyoku dakishimete
mou ichido aenu nara yume no naka de ii
towa no nemuri wo kudasai

kowareru hodo watashi wo tsuyoku dakishimete
yume kara samete wa kieru anata no egao wo
itoshisugiru sono koe mo
mou ichido aeru kara yakusoku shita kara
afureru hodo no ai de yasashiku tsutsunde
towa no nemuri wo kudasai

anata ga mienai
anata ga mienai 


Something I CAN understand ...but can't understand whole sentences...Anyone?
I will try it .. I can't guarantee it being competely correct though.

Scared in solitude
moon is embracing the sky
I cried while searching for you, who I can't see through the tears.

Being reflected in your eyes, I was laughing
in front of your smile which I'll never be able to see again
I can see you screaming on and on in the darkness
dou sugite (?)

Embrace me so strongly I could break apart
If we can't meet again, it's okay even in the dream
I want an eternal sleep.

Embrace me so strongly I could break apart
your smile vanishes when you awake (I can't understand this sentence very well..)
your too lovely voice
we can meet once again because we pledged so
wrap me with love so much I can overflow (again...)
I want an eternal sleep.

I can't see you
I can't see you

I hope it makes sense at least a little bit :)

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Dreamfall
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Post by Dreamfall » Jun 23rd, '07, 21:28

Zenitse Dear...THANK YOU SO MUCH....A+ for you :D
That translation makes absolut sense (Gackt wrote those lyrics so... it must sound cripy and lovely)...he likes to write lil bit dramatic,ne?
DOMOU ARIGATOU!
Later...

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NanaTorigawa
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Post by NanaTorigawa » Jun 23rd, '07, 23:27

have to say compared with alot of the japanese bands... Gackt's lyrics seem to be the easies to translate...

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Dreamfall
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Post by Dreamfall » Jun 24th, '07, 11:42

I've herd different story...some ppl who've been translating his songs said he made up new kanji characters or something like that...And that is hard to explain what he actualy wanted to say in his songs...But I don't mind coz I realy know lil of japanese...

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Dreamfall
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Post by Dreamfall » Jun 28th, '07, 12:56

Hi...help again.......
Are verbs MIRU and MIERU same..? I read some translations and I'm very confused....
Also what are meanings of this words: BAKARI,KAGAYAKU,TATOE,TSUZUKETERU,YUKOU and KASHINA???

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ruisu
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Post by ruisu » Jun 28th, '07, 14:11

Hey Dreamfall...here's what JDICT says:
miru - 見る 【みる】 (v1,vt) (1) to see; to watch; (2) (as an auxiliary verb) to try; (3) to take care of; (P); EP

mieru - 見える 【みえる】 (v1,vi) (1) to be seen; to be in sight; (2) to look; to seem; to appear; (3) (hon) to come; (P); EP

Do you have the Japanese IME installed on your computer? It could really help if you need to use an online dictionary.

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Post by zenitse » Jun 28th, '07, 15:58

Dreamfall wrote:Hi...help again.......
Are verbs MIRU and MIERU same..? I read some translations and I'm very confused....
Also what are meanings of this words: BAKARI,KAGAYAKU,TATOE,TSUZUKETERU,YUKOU and KASHINA???
miru = see, mieru = be visible.

bakari = only, all the time ... not easy to translate by one verb. It can have negative meaning. kare wa terebi dake miru -. he's watching television all the time (which is bad).
kagayaku - glitter
tatoe - example
tsuzuketeru - progressive form of tsuzukeru - go on
yukou - let's go (this may have more meanings, this is first what comes to my mind, I would have to see how does it write..)
kashina ... no idea, don't you mean kashira? that could mean "I wonder..." said by woman, or maybe it could be two words (kashi na) but kashi has several meanings ... I don't know ;)

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&#12362;&#21223;&#12417;&#12398;&#12489;

Post by YoshinoyaNamiCho » Jun 28th, '07, 16:23

こんばんは、

いまごろ日本には人気などラマは何ですか?

ダウンロードをするため、何かお勧めがありませんか?
おしえてくださいね。 :clap:

:D

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Dreamfall
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Post by Dreamfall » Jun 28th, '07, 16:41

Thanks guys...
Zenitse...Kashina is written as one word...but maybe the one who wrote lyrics made mistake...
But you can steel post the meanings of KASHI...it would be helpfull if I compare it to contest of the sentence...
ja-ne...

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lsqB
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Post by lsqB » Jun 28th, '07, 16:59

zenitse wrote:dou sugite (?)
遠過ぎて=But you're too far away.
If we can't meet again, it's okay even in the dream
should be "if we can meet again"

the part you didn't get, it reads like this:
Embrace me to the point that I break.
When I wake from this dream,
Your smile and the your voice that I love too much will both disappear.

We can meet again because we promised each other.
Embrace me with overflowing amount of love,
and please let me sleep eternally.

but then again, I'm cheating because I'm looking at the japanese lyrics.
Props to you for putting up with romaji. I can never do that.


@Dreamfall
I decided to look at gackt's lyric because of what you wrote. (I'm not a gackt fan. not even a neutral listener.)
it doesn't seem like he's making up words, at least in here. It's very straightforward...

also, kashina... could it be Okashina?
the person who transliterated it might have thought the "o" as "wo" and considered it an article instead of part of the word.
okashina = strange

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