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It is illegal to be a Communist in South Korea

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booyakasha
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It is illegal to be a Communist in South Korea

Post by booyakasha » Jul 2nd, '06, 19:45

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_S ... h_Korea%29
* Citizens may not join an organization with aims to overthrow the government;
* Citizens may not create, distribute or possess materials that promote anti-government ideas;
* Citizens may not neglect to report others who violate this law.
Interesting. I never knew that.

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Post by wingsky » Jul 2nd, '06, 21:06

What an odd thread!

That kind of rhetoric makes me think that it is something the Chinese gov't would say in my opinion

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Post by booyakasha » Jul 2nd, '06, 22:13

What I said or what that Korean law says? It really is illegal. People say South Korea is free but you can't be a communist?

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Post by wingsky » Jul 2nd, '06, 22:18

What the law says. Not really a democracy if there's no freedom of speech right? But I suppose no democracy is trully "free"

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Post by TaintedWisdom » Jul 2nd, '06, 22:19

Ekk, after reading the whole thing, it sounds like a totalitarian dictatorship.
Last edited by TaintedWisdom on Jul 2nd, '06, 22:22, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by wingsky » Jul 2nd, '06, 22:21

TaintedWisdom wrote:Errr does it say that...
I read some of it and it doesnt say that.
Yeah it's right there on the 4th paragraph of that page

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Post by TaintedWisdom » Jul 2nd, '06, 22:24

Hehehe, yeah I figured it out a bit late :crazy:

But yeah it sounds like OK YOU ARE FREE, but now dont go saying this.
Funny enough little by little United states is becoming this and is all blamed on terrorism hehe, excuses I swear. Theres nothing more important to the government than controlling it's people and what they say.

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Post by groink » Jul 2nd, '06, 22:52

TaintedWisdom wrote:Funny enough little by little United states is becoming this and is all blamed on terrorism hehe, excuses I swear. Theres nothing more important to the government than controlling it's people and what they say.
Well, you have to remember one major point: South Korea HAS been taken over by another group (Japanese taking over Korea.) The United States, although it has faced terrorism on its soil, has never been taken over. Both countries do have concern for future attempts by groups to take over the nation. But IMHO South Korea, because of its much smaller size and the "guy next door to them", they're a lot more vulnerable than the U.S. Hence the NSA you see there.

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Post by Mythrel » Jul 2nd, '06, 23:11

Its legal in canada to be a communist lol. There is even a communist party except I highly doubt they will ever win lol.

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Post by Gir » Jul 3rd, '06, 00:05

Mythrel wrote:Its legal in canada to be a communist lol. There is even a communist party except I highly doubt they will ever win lol.
Yeah, the American Communist Party always shows up on the U.S. presidental balots too.

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Post by Rakkie » Jul 3rd, '06, 02:07

* Citizens may not join an organization with aims to overthrow the government;
Seems reasonable enough, unless they use it as an excuse to weed out other political parties. I'd prefer to see it worded 'violently overthrow' instead of 'overthrow'.
* Citizens may not create, distribute or possess materials that promote anti-government ideas;
Depends how they interpret this law - i could see this being misused though.
* Citizens may not neglect to report others who violate this law.
Seems stupid to me, but hard to enforce anyway.


Overall, I think it seems pretty mild. Seems like you could still join a Communist party as long as you followed due political process.
Last edited by Rakkie on Jul 3rd, '06, 05:02, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by booyakasha » Jul 3rd, '06, 03:30

Nope, you can't join a communist party. There is no communist party, except for underground ones.

South Korea at one time had the longest-serving political prisoner IN THE WORLD. He was imprisoned because he refused to let go of his communist ideals.

There was also a South Korean soldier who was imprisoned for two years for saying, "I think Korean separation is not North Korean but American fault."

It's not a "mild" law.

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Post by Rakkie » Jul 3rd, '06, 04:08

I meant mild considering they are still technically at war with their communist neighbours.

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Post by Avelyn » Jul 3rd, '06, 04:22

South Korea is moving in the right direction politically, even if it is a slow progression. Let's not forget that only several decades ago it was practically a totalitarian regime sponsered by the U.S. government. The U.S. did technically form the South Korean government before the Soviets formed the North, but if we are going to pass blame around, I would have to assert that blame can be equally distributed between Japan, the U.S., and the former Soviet Union. The key now is to initiate peaceful reunification of the penninsula, but that would take a post the size of a book for us to figure out how. If anyone wants to start a post about that, I'm game.

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Post by aa » Jul 3rd, '06, 04:44

Hmmm... aren't people forgetting that there is a communist country right across the boarder. Personally I think it is necessary because you have no idea how many Kim JongIl spies or supporters are in Korea (versus how many S. Korean spies are actually in N. Korea, given that N. Korea is such a closed off country). And S. Koreans sure don't want to lose their hard earned current living (via capitalism) to some will-nilly N.K. supporters either. What is so ironic is that while Korea -- is moving towards the direction of freedom of speech, hence you see a lot more commentary about N. Korea in different view points that before (unlike in the 1950s when one bleep about N. Korea and you were shot - think Taegukki movie), in N. Korea any word about S. Korea even now and you're automatically labelled a spy and traitor. What a difference a 50+ year of separation between the two sides can make.
Perhaps this law may become antiquitated when the two sides, well espeically N. Korea opens up. But when you still got a country like N. Korea right above, a nation would be a little blind to not have a law to that effect in place.

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Post by booyakasha » Jul 3rd, '06, 06:16

Rakkie wrote:I meant mild considering they are still technically at war with their communist neighbours.
That gives them the right to take away freedom of speech and assembly?
Avelyn wrote:South Korea is moving in the right direction politically, even if it is a slow progression. Let's not forget that only several decades ago it was practically a totalitarian regime sponsered by the U.S. government. The U.S. did technically form the South Korean government before the Soviets formed the North, but if we are going to pass blame around, I would have to assert that blame can be equally distributed between Japan, the U.S., and the former Soviet Union. The key now is to initiate peaceful reunification of the penninsula, but that would take a post the size of a book for us to figure out how. If anyone wants to start a post about that, I'm game.
The question is, what type of economy and political system will this reunified Korea have? Neither side is willing to give in.

I did read a poll taken in Seoul that said that the majority of Koreans would join North Korea to fight off American invaders if America was to invade North Korea again.
aa wrote:Hmmm... aren't people forgetting that there is a communist country right across the boarder. Personally I think it is necessary because you have no idea how many Kim JongIl spies or supporters are in Korea (versus how many S. Korean spies are actually in N. Korea, given that N. Korea is such a closed off country).
South Korea is just as closed off as North Korea. North Koreans aren't allowed into South Korea, the border is guarded just as fiercely on both sides.
aa wrote:And S. Koreans sure don't want to lose their hard earned current living (via capitalism) to some will-nilly N.K. supporters either.
Communist supporters are taking money from South Korean citizens? This is new to me. I've never heard of communists stealing money from the working class.
aa wrote:What is so ironic is that while Korea -- is moving towards the direction of freedom of speech, hence you see a lot more commentary about N. Korea in different view points that before (unlike in the 1950s when one bleep about N. Korea and you were shot - think Taegukki movie), in N. Korea any word about S. Korea even now and you're automatically labelled a spy and traitor. What a difference a 50+ year of separation between the two sides can make.
We're talking about South Korea. South Korea claims to be the "democratic Korea," while North Korea is painted as totalitarian and evil, black and white. South Korea is supposed to be a democracy, but it doesn't even allow a basic pillar of democracy- freedom of speech.
aa wrote: Perhaps this law may become antiquitated when the two sides, well espeically N. Korea opens up. But when you still got a country like N. Korea right above, a nation would be a little blind to not have a law to that effect in place.
North Koreans have a hard time sneaking into South Korea as spies. The South Korean border is guarded very well. The communists that have been arrested in Korea have been South Koreans, not North Korean spies or willy-nillys.

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Post by aa » Jul 4th, '06, 07:03

booyakasha wrote:That gives them the right to take away freedom of speech and assembly?
I don't know how much of Korean history you know of or if you're Korean or not. But this law does not eliminate the right to protest and free speech stuff. If anything Korea has a very strong protest culture. As for free speech - true Korea isn't America - but it has made much improvements since the 1970s-1980s and it's progressing. However, if you show very obvious pro-Pyongyang acts then you might want to be more cautious over how you act since the South Korean government might be keeping it's eye out for you [sorta like how the U.S. government is watching out for the terrorists who may be operating within the U.S.]. (which brings me to another point that I'll mention later) Lately this law has been called into effect if people were seen siding either ways with Pyongyang - whether criticizing it (possibly an affect of the Uri Party strength, which by the way is diminishing) or supporting it.
I did read a poll taken in Seoul that said that the majority of Koreans would join North Korea to fight off American invaders if America was to invade North Korea again.
^ As with anywhere else, polls reveal trends. And it appeared that this was the trend at that time - and I'm surmising at the peak of Uri Party strength, since that's when I've also noticed those types of polls. Things can change. One day the Americans can be bad guys, Chinese, next the Japanese. As for N. Koreans, with Kim Daejung and movies like Swiri the people are seeing a distinction between the government and the people. And now it seems that the winds are changing - people are wondering if Korea is doing so much/ spending so much money, for N. Korea why isn't N. Korea opening up?
South Korea is just as closed off as North Korea. North Koreans aren't allowed into South Korea, the border is guarded just as fiercely on both sides.
The South Korean border is guarded very well. The communists that have been arrested in Korea have been South Koreans, not North Korean spies or willy-nillys.
^It just isn't the 38th parallel you should think about. Spies can enter through by pretending to be refugees/defectors wanting to go to S. Korea (which of course people are screened for). And don't forget that there is a Pro-Pyongyang association in Japan. What makes you think N. Korea can't have people sent to S. Korea via Japan?

True to a certain extent that it's S. Koreans that were arrested. But given the openess of S. Korean society (relative to N. Korea's) Pro-NK groups can be much more active (like the Hankyeroh). Though N. Korea is more controlling, restrictive than S. Korea and more closed off than S. Korea. For the NK government that is one of the ace they use. On the other hand S. Korea being such an open society it's probably not hard for N.K. partyliners to know down to what's happening domestically in the government.
Communist supporters are taking money from South Korean citizens? This is new to me. I've never heard of communists stealing money from the working class.
Maybe I should've said a bit more (lol but this already pretty long).
This brings to my other point... that I alluded to in the beginning. It's not stealing in the literal sense. It's more like S. Korea supporting all these causes to help N. K. open with it's economy (think Kaesong Industrial park) . But, S. Korea isn't really profiting economically from - although maybe in the long run it's possible with Kaesong
Also if NK favorable politicans take the lead, guess where's the money gonna go. I suppose it's all relative between what's a better cause (but under whose style of government is the question). And this brings me to another point. It's not strictly communism versus democracy. N. Korea can no longer be considered a communist state. Rather these days the term use is Pro-Pyongyang if you're that sorta person.

We're talking about South Korea. South Korea claims to be the "democratic Korea," while North Korea is painted as totalitarian and evil, black and white. South Korea is supposed to be a democracy, but it doesn't even allow a basic pillar of democracy- freedom of speech.
Like I said before - Korea has freedom of speech - like America? Probably not but. Compared to 20 years ago, Korea has changed a lot. And like I said before - Korea has a strong protest culture. Heck now-a-days there's groups like Hankyeroh that exist (they're pro-Pyongyang) - which 20-50 years ago would not have been possible to exist in Korea to the visibility of today with the activities they carry out. This group also has likes to start anti-American protests too btw.

Finally, not sure what's so surprising that this type of law is in effect. If it is the fact that the very law exists when it shouldn't, then I suppose that's you're opinion. But as stated in the Wiki article, most Koreans support the law with future amendments added if needed.

...man... this is like the most I've ever written I this forum. :alcoholic:

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Post by sunshine4ever » Jul 4th, '06, 18:02

TaintedWisdom wrote:Hehehe, yeah I figured it out a bit late :crazy:

But yeah it sounds like OK YOU ARE FREE, but now dont go saying this.
Funny enough little by little United states is becoming this and is all blamed on terrorism hehe, excuses I swear. Theres nothing more important to the government than controlling it's people and what they say.
I agree with you on this aspect. But I think the government is made of the people (well at least in a democracy world) and so that's why the majority of those who favor democracy will likely dislike other groups. I mean, people are afraid of being stripped off power that's why there's such laws like above to restrain people from following other "groups".

I'm not rather shocked that Korea has to have such laws because they're next to North Korea which is a communist country. They live in fear and afraid that their government will be corrupted.

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Post by booyakasha » Jul 8th, '06, 00:45

You really think South Koreans are scared that the DPRK will "corrupt" their government?

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Re: It is illegal to be a Communist in South Korea

Post by Tasogare Kuma » Jul 10th, '06, 09:25

booyakasha wrote:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_S ... h_Korea%29
* Citizens may not join an organization with aims to overthrow the government;
* Citizens may not create, distribute or possess materials that promote anti-government ideas;
* Citizens may not neglect to report others who violate this law.
Interesting. I never knew that.
You may find the first point to be illegal in many democratic countries. "Freedom of speech" and conspiring to overthrow a democratic elected government are two pair of shoes, really. First one is called voicing one's opinion, second one is called coup d'etat.

Point two, is the translation from wiki even correct (I don't trust wiki, anyone can change things in it)? I'd rather assume they mean anti-constitutional, or something else along that line, which is illegal in pretty much every democratic country, too.

Point three can be found in any country I've ever been too. If you're witness of a criminal offense, you have to report it. If not, you may commit a crime yourself, since you'd help covering it up.

I give you a different example. Austria is a democratic country. But it is a criminal offense to openly deny the existence of concentration camps and gas chambers. Does it violate freedom of speech? I think not. It possibly violates the right to be ignorant and stupid, but that's a different thing.

What I find more amazing is, how can people -even after seeing how clearly Communism failed- still be Communists?

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Post by Néa Vanille » Jul 10th, '06, 09:35

Yepp. In Austria, it is illegal to be a nazi.

You are not allowed to sing Hitler paroles, praise nazis in public or deny the existence of the concentration camps in public.

I'm fine with it. I do not think that "free speech" is the be-all and end-all of modern politics - there is such a thing as respect towards the millions of victims of the holocaust and rights for the greater good.

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Re: It is illegal to be a Communist in South Korea

Post by groink » Jul 10th, '06, 09:49

Tasogare Kuma wrote:Point two, is the translation from wiki even correct (I don't trust wiki, anyone can change things in it)?
In December 2005, an independant panel of experts in various fields studied both Wikipedia and Encyclopedia Britannica. 2.92 mistakes were found in Encyclopedia Britannica, and 3.86 errors in Wikipedia. The errors in Wikipedia can be fixed, while the errors in a hardcopy book is impossible to correct unless you go out and buy a later edition. Statistically, Wikipedia is just as accurate as Encyplopedia Britannica. And, Wikipedia has a better chance of being correct within a short period of time than a hardcopy book, simply because thousands of editors are at Wikipedia monitoring virtually all the articles and checking for things like NPOV, proper interpretation of sources, and so on.

http://news.com.com/Study+Wikipedia+as+ ... 97332.html

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South Korea

Post by goupe » Jul 10th, '06, 10:20

As someone who worked with Koreans in the US in the 1980's and has been interested in Korean for many years, I gotta agree with booyaksha, S. Korea has a veneer of democracy, but the reality is different.

Espionage is one thing, but why would a N. Korean spy ever openly identify themselves as "political"? They wouldn't, they'd steer clear of politics.

The law has one purpose, top scare people away from participating in any "unsanctioned" political activities.

The US has opposed Korean democracy since before the Korean war, itself the result of the US choosing to keep Japanese troops and colonial administrators in place rather than trust populist Korean organizations.

Nuff said.

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Post by Néa Vanille » Jul 10th, '06, 11:25

Being a Communist was semi-illegal in the US for a while as well, resulting in the banning of many actors and actresses who were believed to have Communist ideals as well as a few popular European authors - and the Americans were never even threatened by Communists in their own country!

I'd say it's understandable.

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Post by 20centuryboy » Jul 10th, '06, 12:23

booyakasha wrote:
Rakkie wrote:I meant mild considering they are still technically at war with their communist neighbours.
That gives them the right to take away freedom of speech and assembly?
If the security of the country is in the balance, yes. Absolute Democracy is a luxury some countries can't afford. With the country being cut into and the north being in the hand of some psychos it's might by risky to have a full freedom of speech and act.

Well, if you ask me, I prefer to live in south Korea than in the north. :crazy:

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Re: It is illegal to be a Communist in South Korea

Post by booyakasha » Jul 10th, '06, 19:53

Tasogare Kuma wrote:
What I find more amazing is, how can people -even after seeing how clearly Communism failed- still be Communists?
"They talk about the failure of socialism but where is the success of capitalism in Africa, Asia and Latin America?" - Fidel Castro

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Re: It is illegal to be a Communist in South Korea

Post by nikochanr3 » Jul 10th, '06, 19:59

booyakasha wrote:
Tasogare Kuma wrote:
What I find more amazing is, how can people -even after seeing how clearly Communism failed- still be Communists?
"They talk about the failure of socialism but where is the success of capitalism in Africa, Asia and Latin America?" - Fidel Castro
Japan, South Korea, South AFrica, Australia (if you want to stretch) and almost kind of china at this point. If you want to argue counties, there's quite a few countries with free economies in latin and south americas.

that's a real stretch to say all capitalism has not been succesful, when the two largest economies are captalist, and of the former communist countires, a lot of the economic engine driving china (whose economy is going full force) is capitalist.

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Re: It is illegal to be a Communist in South Korea

Post by booyakasha » Jul 10th, '06, 22:58

nikochanr3 wrote:
Japan, South Korea, South AFrica, Australia (if you want to stretch) and almost kind of china at this point. If you want to argue counties, there's quite a few countries with free economies in latin and south americas.
Bangladesh, East Timor, Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar, Cambodia.

China is #85 on the Human Development Index. Get out of here with your nonsense.

Just because there is Japan, South Korea, Singapore, doesn't mean Asia has done well under capitalism.

How does the US or any other country have a "free economy." There isn't a country in the world with a free economy.
that's a real stretch to say all capitalism has not been succesful, when the two largest economies are captalist, and of the former communist countires, a lot of the economic engine driving china (whose economy is going full force) is capitalist.
Capitalism has made some countries very rich. For most countries it has left them in poverty, working for the rich capitalist countries. That's how capitalism works, not everyone can live well under capitalism.

Now, for example.. Cuba, the only socialist economy left, is ranked #52 on human development index. Above your beloved China and your so-called successful Asian countries.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_co ... ment_Index

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Capitalism Makes Countries Rich?

Post by goupe » Jul 30th, '06, 16:01

I agree with the thrust of the last posting, but it's not really true that capitalism makes any country rich, rather it makes some people in some countries richer than it makes some other people in other countries.

And the bottom line is that under capitalism the vast majority of people own barely nothing (who actually owns the mortgaged home and car?) and live only a few months from poverty should they be laid-off or fall sick without health insurance.

Yes, the standard of living in the West is much higher than most of the rest of the world, outside a handful or countries like Japan.

But just look at the true state of the US today in terms of income distribution and access to health care, education, personal security (as opposed the the chimera of national security) and culture, not the mention the psychological toll of job insecurity and all the other forms of stress that people are burdened with.

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Post by toxicity » Jul 31st, '06, 21:57

Funny that South Korea can't have a communist party. There's one in France but to my opinion they suck lol!! They don't have great ideas lol!!

I can understand how South Korean government feels about communist. Korea has been divided because of ideas like Germany or Vietnam... So sad!

Do you know that in France, you can say that colonialism is a positiv thing? It sucks!!! How can a teacher say this to kids?

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Post by keiko001 » Aug 2nd, '06, 18:02

NOTHING AGAINST SOUTH - OR NORTH KOREA!!!!!!!!!!!! NOTHING AGAINST THE COMMUNISTS!!!!!!!AS THERE WERE COMMUNISTS IN RUSSIA THERE WEREN´T ANY NAZI ORGANISATIONS! LOOK AT CHINA, STILL A FRIENDLY AND A " REAL ORGANIZED" STATE!!

IT´S SO STUPID THAT BEING A COMMUNIST IS ILLEGAL IN SOUTH KOREA! I THINK IT IS A DEMOCRATIC STATE WHY AREN´T SOUTH KOREAN CITIZENS ALLOWED TO BE COMMUNISTS?? IT´S A FREE STATE WITH FREE DECISIONS ISN´´T IT??

AND WHAT´S MORE FRUSTRATING: THERE WAS A STATE CALLED KOREA, SO WHY DO SOUTH KOREANS HATE NORTH KOREANS AND THE NORTH KOREANS HATE THE SOUTH KOREANS? THEY ARE ONE NATION, THEY SPEAK ONE LANGUAGE ! DOES IT HAVE TO BE SO???

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Post by booyakasha » Aug 3rd, '06, 04:32

It's the governments that hate each other. The people of Korea want to be united.

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Post by shiny plastic » Aug 3rd, '06, 14:35

Well..why would you want to be a communist in a democratic country :|

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Post by marvelous » Aug 3rd, '06, 15:55

It's really not about capitalism nor communism... But imperialism...

Strongest country takes over weaker countries then other countries follow or fight back...

I think we all have capitalistic and communistic ideas... It's in us... We can't really say one way is right and other is wrong... One is evil or saint....

Only reason South Korea is doing well economically is because of America but there's a trade off... You do what they tell you... Don't develop nuclear weapons, etc.... That is why they have the laws prohibiting communist ideas...

South Korea and Japan are just puppets of American Government... China is slowly becoming one but are free from American meddling their way of life...

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Post by nikochanr3 » Aug 3rd, '06, 16:04

marvelous wrote:It's really not about capitalism nor communism... But imperialism...

Strongest country takes over weaker countries then other countries follow or fight back...

I think we all have capitalistic and communistic ideas... It's in us... We can't really say one way is right and other is wrong... One is evil or saint....

Only reason South Korea is doing well economically is because of America but there's a trade off... You do what they tell you... Don't develop nuclear weapons, etc.... That is why they have the laws prohibiting communist ideas...

South Korea and Japan are just puppets of American Government... China is slowly becoming one but are free from American meddling their way of life...
how is korea a puppet of the US? besides shared security, the amount of things they disagree with us on is huge. they dont always vote with us, dont submit troops if we ask, dont even speak in public in agreement.

if a country is free, and respects free ideals is it a puppet? or must it be communist and approve of despots to be free of our influence.

:salut: you just insulted japan and korea and china in one sentence in a vey glib way. i disagree.

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Post by pokute » Aug 3rd, '06, 16:32

What is attractive about communism in a democracy are the tenets of Shavian Fabianism, foremost of which is "From each according to his ability, to each according to his need". The idea is that the strong should defend the weak, the healthy should nurture the sick, and, gasp, that those with a talent for making money should apply it to the betterment of general conditions by maintaining the infrastructure required by modern urban life.

The free-market capitalism that we espouse (and which is in practice a false front propped over an agressive and rapacious imperialism) is insufficiently concerned with the welfare of the weakest members of society to maintain them in an urban environment, and the result is disaffection, homelessness, and desperation for an increasingly large percentage of the population. And just because YOU don't see them does not mean that the desperate and disposessed are not all around you.

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Post by marvelous » Aug 3rd, '06, 19:21

nikochanr3 wrote:
marvelous wrote:It's really not about capitalism nor communism... But imperialism...

Strongest country takes over weaker countries then other countries follow or fight back...

I think we all have capitalistic and communistic ideas... It's in us... We can't really say one way is right and other is wrong... One is evil or saint....

Only reason South Korea is doing well economically is because of America but there's a trade off... You do what they tell you... Don't develop nuclear weapons, etc.... That is why they have the laws prohibiting communist ideas...

South Korea and Japan are just puppets of American Government... China is slowly becoming one but are free from American meddling their way of life...
how is korea a puppet of the US? besides shared security, the amount of things they disagree with us on is huge. they dont always vote with us, dont submit troops if we ask, dont even speak in public in agreement.

if a country is free, and respects free ideals is it a puppet? or must it be communist and approve of despots to be free of our influence.

:salut: you just insulted japan and korea and china in one sentence in a vey glib way. i disagree.
They don't submit troops? :crazy: Sure Koreans didn't submit troops for Vietnam and Iraq war... They went there to party... :whistling:

Free from what? What freedom does Korean people have except a separated country between fueds from Soviets, Chinese, and Americans trying to imperialize Korea? Free idea that is controlled by American govt...

There is no such thing as free... Everything has a price...

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Post by Bam-Bam » Aug 4th, '06, 02:07

This is a good website for what's going on in Korea:

http://www.rjkoehler.com/

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Post by nikochanr3 » Aug 4th, '06, 02:20

ive decided not to respond. Japanese, Korean (and soon chinese!) you are all puppets. Anytime you agree with the US, yuo are just following our lead out of fear! You puppets!

:scratch:

one thing i dont get, and you cant deny this. WIthout the US, the whole of Korea would be like North Korea. Theres not a disparity in resources, etc. Its just how the country is run. Its not communist. Its Elitist. The people in charge own everything, and have everything. Kim Jong has a huge castle, no? If the US counterweight was not there, wouldnt north korea just come down? would china suddenly become a huge supporter of a free country next door?

am i missing these things?

i dont think even the countries that did try to practice real communism had food for everyone. I dont think anyone has ever really tried.

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Post by marvelous » Aug 4th, '06, 04:29

South Korea would never be like North Korea because before America, Soviets, Japanese, Chinese interfered there was only 1 Korea... With Kings and Princesses.. .Kim Jong Il would have been a nobody...

Chinese has always supported Korea and have 5000 years of hisotry together... Read some history books...

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