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Jdrama and the Japanese Language

Talk about the culture and entertainment from Nihon.
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sandersmc
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Jdrama and the Japanese Language

Post by sandersmc » Mar 26th, '08, 14:25

Being into japanese culture is great, as it comes with all the dramas, films, food, e.c.t

But how many of you on here have pruposley learned japanese simply to watch the dramas without the need to wait for a fan sub, now dont get me wrong repsect to all the subbers out there you guys & gals do a wonderful job.

But it is very nice to get excited about a drama that is airing after you finishesd work or school then sit down and watch it straight away and enjoy it, in it's native language how it was meant to be listened to.

just thought i would bring this up as i am one who was learning japanese langauge then come across the wonder of drama and tv shows which made me want to learn it even faster.

Responses to this guys would be great, to hear what you guys have done.

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Issy
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Post by Issy » Mar 26th, '08, 14:55

WELL, i am teaching myself japanese because i love the language and the culture and that was way before getting addicted to japanese dramas. (i was big manga fan and i wanted to be able to read them and understand) but now i also want to learn more and more to be able to fully understand japanese dramas and other programs and can hold a decent conversation when i go to japan.
but it's so true that japanese dramas, are a great way to improve your nihongo. when i look at myself, at very begining, i hardly could understand anything (even though was studing at the same time) but now, i see myself having less need to read subs and can understand at least 40% of what being said just by watching these dramas.
it has also helped to make small conversational sentenses that i was not able to do so before. :cheers:

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groink
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Post by groink » Mar 26th, '08, 22:23

I'm learning Japanese so that I can watch and understand Japanese porn.

Just kidding!

I'm learning Japanese because i should have realized 20+ years ago that it would be a very useful language to know. In Hawaii, knowledge of Japanese opens up a infinite number of opportunities, including:

- Travel industry employment
- Translation services
- Government employment on all levels and sectors
- Japanese girlfriend

Man, why is sex keep popping up... Anyway, the ability to watch Japanese dramas without subtitles is more of a bonus for me.

--- groink

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Post by emerica1123 » Mar 27th, '08, 02:43

It's more of just a bonus for me, but it is where I first got the idea to study Japanese.

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Post by quashlo » Mar 27th, '08, 04:15

Recently, there are a lot of people who are beginning to study the language because they are interested in manga or anime. At my high school, there were many students who took classes because they wanted to be illustrators or were huge anime maniacs. I wasn't into that at all, and actually I began taking classes out of accident (I wanted a break from Spanish, which was too easy for an English speaker). After a couple of years of just messing around in Japanese class, I finally got serious about the language itself, and kanji in particular. After high school, I took one year in college, but after that, I wasn't able to fit classes into my schedule. I didn't want to waste those five years of Japanese, so I decided to continue learning on my own and got into dramas, music, etc. Now, i don't know what I would do without Japanese music, television, magazines, books... I cringe at the thought of going back to American TV, as it's just not the same. In fact, I feel completely disconnected from the MTV-watching twenty-something young American male, but I take that as a good thing. :lol Nowadays, I'm not learning for anything in particular, but it gives me some enjoyment and keeps my mind going. It also gives you a whole different cultural perspective that you wouldn't have access to otherwise. Besides, you never know when a second language could turn out to be a huge asset in a career. To get back on topic though, it always helps to have some form of motivation when you are trying to learn the language. It could be something popular like anime or manga, or something more unusual like Zen or sumo. Whatever it is, it's good to have.

With regard to dramas and other TV shows, they're always much better without subs... Subs take your eyes away from the action and can't always convey everything that's really being said. For intermediate learners, I really recommend variety shows, as you get quite a bit of pop culture in and a lot of them, like HEYx3, show the Japanese on the bottom, so you get listening and reading comprehension at the same time. Besides, I find them more entertaining than your average drama--most of the dramas nowadays are hit or miss. I also recommend getting magazines or books, or visiting news sites like asahi.com, as that's probably the easiest way to pick up vocabulary and you can go at your own pace without feeling rushed. I realize books and such aren't easy for some people if they don't have something like a Kinokuniya nearby, but college libraries are also a good place to try.

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Post by kendo_bc » Mar 27th, '08, 04:59

Doramas and variety shows are great for increasing your listening skills, they get you used to hearing the language and you understand how to use certain everyday words and phrases. A word of warning though, you should try and cultivate a japanese friend in order to run things by them. There are words/phrases that are gender specific so you japanese could not sound as...manly...as you think it might. (= If you don't have the benefit of a japanese friend pay attention to who says a certain phrase/word and if the other sex says it at all (and make sure they are not an okama (= ).

I didn't start with dorama though, I started watching anime about...my god has it been that long...20 years ago. Bootlegs were life back then, and you were damn lucky if they were subtitled. It's great to see how the community (anime/manga/dorama) has grown since then.

I was off and on again with my Japanese, finally really settled down to seriously study it a couple years ago. I finally moved to Japan last year. I am now married (yes she is Japanese) and enjoying my new life here.


A couple hints on the language:

Romaji is the devil, stay with hiragana and katakana. Also, you may be surprised how often katakana is used so do not neglect it. Also, jump in with kanji as soon as possible. It is a great way to learn new vocabulary, and learning it is actually fun. (= Little practice books for elementary school children are great things to use. Simple sentences with beginner kanji.

The first thing you should master is pronunciation, once you have that you can say everything and hopefully eventually you won't sound like a gaijin. I know people who have lived in Japan for over 5 years and though they can speak Japanese better, their pronunciation is much worse than mine. I drilled my pronunciation all the time when I started. It's so easy to do compared to English. Just because you might look like a gaijin doesn't mean you need to sound like one. ;)

Don't split your attention among different learning books. Research, pick one and stick with it. I recommend Genki as it suits my learning style and tastes. There are other good ones out there.

Don't take anything that you read in textbooks/etc as 100% accurate. I have found every book I have ever read/studied has mistakes or misleading definitions in it. Always double check things with a native speaker if possible. Some words are used very definitely then some books indicate or there may be an English word that translates into 2 or more Japanese words and you should know how and when to use them.

I was never into manga before I came to Japan, but I am picking it up. That is another good practice tool. You could read the English translation and then self-translate a Japanese copy.

SomethingI use to practice my Japanese are cookbooks, I do 99% of the cooking here so learning to read a recipe is important. (=

Anyways, Japanese is fun. Enjoy it. If you really want to learn it though get your a$$ over here. (=

Any other gaijin in Japan out there? (= Drop me a line.

Cheers,

Kendobc

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Post by scaturan » Mar 27th, '08, 05:46

I'm about to tackle basic Japanese I on a more serious level - for now, going to self-study.

I was never into anime/manga and most likely, never will. Other than DA, I watch various shows on TV-Japan from documentaries to kabuki, SUMO, music shows, news, dorama, etc... - it helps me pickup pronunciation, intonation, and slang words. I don't understand everything but can identify lots of common phrases, slang words. And of course, a daily dose of Japanese music from The Brilliant Green (can't live without it).

I know it's not easy, and will take years... but if this daily effort of mine helps me get a clue of what Motokariya Yuika (本仮屋ユイカ) writes on her blog, then its all good, baby! :)

And lastly, I concur what groink mentioned about the opportunities available as a result of being familiar with the language.

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Post by ivoSF » Mar 29th, '08, 01:38

actualy watching j-drama was added last to the reasons i want to learn japanese

in the netherlands they aired dragonballz on tv, then some years alter around 1999 when i was bored i remembered the show and looked it up on internet and watched the eps then in ugly real media format.
somehow i found out there where other anime shows, but did not realy watch much until a few years later around 2003, when i got unemployed and got realy bored, so i went to look for entertainment and found a lot of subbed anime episode and watched an AWEFULL lot.

by this time i got a little curious about japanese also in this time i watched hikaru no go and thought the game rocked, this lead to mine second japanese related passion, the board game of GO(igo) its mine big passion (translated)and i think i will never grow bored of it and play it for the rest of mine life. im now a dutch NIDAN, what equals about GODAN in japan so if there are other go players here you can always challenge me to a game! or i can teach you if you want to learn the game!

around this time i also got into translated manga and some time later i found the "forbidden"world of (translated)h-games, i supose i am only human :)

by this time those various things together made me interrested in the japanese language, of course by this time i picked up the standard "onii-san" words, but it was not until the end 2005 that i seriously considered learning japanese.

in 2007 i got serious about learning japanese and started to make real efforts to learn the language.
part of this was the deccision that in order to learn japanese i should use real-life sources, in other words japanese tv so that is when i found d-addicts and joined up.
sincesome time i am also watching eps without sub.
although this is a lot harder and i often cant follow things, i notice that becouse i must active try to understand it learning goes faster.

mine japanese learning activities now are:

watching anime
watching dorama
learning words with wordlists in anki
reading the japanese graded books level 2 and 3
playing the game clannad untranslated(i have to look up a lot)
reading manga in japanese(also have to look up a lot)

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Post by Anthony1709 » Mar 29th, '08, 02:07

Yeah I really want to start self learning Japanese as well but not sure where to start. Any advice anyone? It would be much appreciated. Thanks. :D

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Post by ic1male » Mar 29th, '08, 11:37

groink wrote:I'm learning Japanese so that I can watch and understand Japanese porn.
--- groink
Me, too! I'm dying to know what the boys are saying in those videos from Coat Kuratatsu. :lol

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sandersmc
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Post by sandersmc » Mar 31st, '08, 08:55

Anthony1709 wrote:Yeah I really want to start self learning Japanese as well but not sure where to start. Any advice anyone? It would be much appreciated. Thanks. :D
I think if you dive straight in, i know this sounds scary and others might have a different view alltogether on this but for me and im saying this worked for me so you might want to pick and choose of what you like the sound of and what you don't.

But i think starting out with Hiragana & katakana get these out of the way first as soon as possible when you have these down which should be max of about a week if you are half serious about study if really serious then about a day or two, then go on to kanji, for me the basis of understanding japanese better for me stems through understaning kanji from the very beginning more kanji and japanese words you know the faster learning will be, this is what ive found.

Once you start studying Kanji since you are already on here get subbed drama ,tv anything in japanese, im not a fan of subs when starting out but for a little while at least this will be a stableizer for a month or so until you get a basic vocab as soon as you get a basic vocab turn those subs OFF!!! also as well get one or rwo shows without subs this is just to get your ear used to the lilt of the speech so it does not sound alien to you don't worry if you don't understand anything as you are just getting your ears used to the speech

Then armed with your ears and a dictionary search out words you are hearing not all of course but the ones you hear frequently, plus you will be picking up new words through the kanji you are studying. oh and make sure you get jp shows or dramas you like the sound of as when watching you don't want to be bored, bored = not learning much and if it's fun learing then it feels like your not actually studying

I know this was a long response but break it down and if you have questions let me know, this worked for me i have not said everything about my learning japanese here, but put the effort in and study right and in a years time i think you will be pretty conversational and within about 18months pretty much fluent might be a little rough around the edges but 18 months is not bad, to be watching your dramas you love and tv and understanding almost all of it, and the words you dont know look it up and find it out and thats another word to add to your vocab HIT LIST!!

Take it easy

Martin

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Post by nothin » Mar 31st, '08, 17:15

I watched Japanese anime for more than a year thanks to that i now understand 30%- 60% what is being said in the Jdramas

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Post by garnet07 » Apr 5th, '08, 02:29

So true, I wanted to understand Japanese so that I don't have to wait for subs or scanlators to read or watch my favorite animes or mangas. I took 2 quarters of Japanese in college and learned Hiragana, Katakana and learned like 2000 Kanji characters. But because I haven't taken the class for so long, I'm forgetting how to write it. But I understand like 70-80% of non-subbed jdoramas. Well at least the non-business or non-historical ones like Hanakimi.

Dang, those 2000 Kanji characters are so hard to remember. I think I only remember the kanji for 1-10, family members, lol that's it right now. I'm so slow learning a new language :-(

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Post by tsumabukis » Apr 9th, '08, 10:44

I'd just like to defer slightly from what sandersmc said... be wary of the timeframes he's given. I've lived in Japan for 2 years and only now do I feel I have a communicative grasp on the language (I'm a little beyond level 3 on the JLPT, if that means anything to anyone).

Of course, this depends on what exactly you're studying, how hard you study (I study an hour or two every day), how much you practice and what kind of learner you are. But don't be frightened off if you don't learn everything in the times he's given. :) I, for instance, only felt I had a proper, firm grasp on the kana after 2 months. Admittedly, I didn't study very hard back then, but it does take time to commit things to memory properly. :)

Anyway... I agree with most of what he said. Try to immerse yourself in the language as much as possible. It's also helpful to get yourself a couple of textbooks so you have some sort of structure. There are loads available.

And that's totally off-topic! Haha. For me it's kind of the opposite - I use JDrama as a means of studying Japanese - I usually watch stuff on TV first, and then download it with subs to see how correct or how far beyond correct I was in my understanding. ^_^

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Post by Illanair » Apr 9th, '08, 11:50

I used to be a complete Anime Otaku, interested in everything Japanese - but finally outgrew it. (I even managed a 110 episode marathon of Naruto once....Stupid holidays :goggle: )

Now I have a more relaxed interest in the Japanese language. I know a few useful phrases (Very useful indeed when you hear schoolmates spewing out random sentences from X, Y or Z anime)

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sandersmc
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Post by sandersmc » Apr 15th, '08, 13:37

tsumabukis wrote:I'd just like to defer slightly from what sandersmc said... be wary of the timeframes he's given. I've lived in Japan for 2 years and only now do I feel I have a communicative grasp on the language (I'm a little beyond level 3 on the JLPT, if that means anything to anyone).
I agree be wary of what time frames i have given this was my own experience and the progress i was making :) some of you may be at the same pace and others not, but i think as long as your learning at a good rate and picking up some new japanese daily you are on the right track.

tsumabukis - for me jlpt is good if your living over japan and can prove your at a certain level, if you are applying for a job, which i will so have to take when i decide to live in japan, but my overall goal when starting out was to just be comfortable in the langauge so right now i can pick up a book and read it without much trouble watch drama's and speak to freinds comfortably, and just be relaxed in japanese and not have to keep thinking ahh what does this and that mean.

Where am i now at a japanese level i would say pretty fluent, but others might say not so,i think this depends on each others idea of fluency, even if one says that im not fluent does it matter not to me im happy where i am at now sure i have trouble with a kanji that i have not seen before and odd words here and there, (Oh and Bara no nai Hanaya threw up quite a few things i had to look up) but because im at the stage where i can look it up and within 5 mins i know it then i think my hard work in learning the language has so many benifits.

tsumabukis - if you don't mind me asking do you work in japan or are you studying.

and thank you for taking time to respond to the question

Many Thanks

Martin

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Post by tsumabukis » Apr 15th, '08, 22:53

Fully. The only reason I did the JLPT was because I needed motivation to study. When I first came over to Japan, I really had very little motivation to study the language properly, as most things I dealt with daily were in English. But then, I got off my backside, went out and made some Japanese friends, so now I have motivation to study (and learn a lot faster too, by speaking to them) without the test.

Yeh, fluency in Japanese is weird. I don't think a gaijin can ever call themselves fluent. But then, a few Japanese people I know still don't know more than maybe 5000 kanji. A while ago I had to have some medical documents translated into English for me, and the person translating them didn't even know what the words were in Japanese, let alone English. :P

Language levels are totally personal. If you feel the only thing you ever want Japanese for is to watch J-drama, then there's no point ever learning kanji, right? I think if you're happy with the level of language you know, then good for you. ^_^

Oh, and I'm here... hmmm... out of the two options - for work. :)

Sorry, I went waffling on again. Gomen ne! :P

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Post by torerling » Apr 16th, '08, 16:16

Some times there are written texts also in dramas, that would be nice, and it's also easier to practice japanese when you have the kanji, but if you have a spot you don't HAVE to know kanji..

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XiaoPauli
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Post by XiaoPauli » Apr 16th, '08, 17:33

tsumabukis wrote:But then, a few Japanese people I know still don't know more than maybe 5000 kanji. A while ago I had to have some medical documents translated into English for me, and the person translating them didn't even know what the words were in Japanese, let alone English. :P
Well, for that case, that's a problem common in all languages when it comes to a specific domain. In the reverse case, most native English speakers would not understand the terminology used in medical documents as well, much less Japanese. Medical journals contain lots of Greek- and Latin-based words anyway. There are courses in pre-med programs dedicated to learning medical terminology. :D

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Post by Riee109 » Apr 16th, '08, 17:49

tsumabukis wrote: Yeh, fluency in Japanese is weird. I don't think a gaijin can ever call themselves fluent. But then, a few Japanese people I know still don't know more than maybe 5000 kanji. A while ago I had to have some medical documents translated into English for me, and the person translating them didn't even know what the words were in Japanese, let alone English. :P
"still don't know more than maybe 5000 Kanji"?
I think 5000 Kanji is a lot for a Japanese person.
In daily life you only need about 2000-3000 Kanji!

What did you expect?!

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Post by tsumabukis » Apr 17th, '08, 11:23

Riee109 wrote:"still don't know more than maybe 5000 Kanji"?
I think 5000 Kanji is a lot for a Japanese person.
In daily life you only need about 2000-3000 Kanji!

What did you expect?!
Gyaa! Sorry, that was a really stupid typo. :P I meant 2,000. :P

A few of my friends still need the furigana in their manga. ;) But then, I do live in Okinawa, which has the lowest high schools scores in the country. :P

XiaoPauli - agreed, but I'm talking about standard medical forms here, nothing complicated. :)

I really should read over my posts before posting them. :P

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hmm... just wondering..

Post by minamichan03 » May 21st, '08, 06:33

hi! and i'm a japanese too..
and i really wanna learn kanji.. though i can speak.. i think it would be a problem for me,if i only know of a few kanji in the near future when i go to japan...

could you tell me ways how to study kanji in much easier ways...

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Post by melonyhappy » May 21st, '08, 17:05

I wished I attempted to learn 10 years ago... when i initally got addicted to anime... I'm starting to attempt it.. not much for doramas, but for my fangirly self... it's hard to watch interviews of my fav. idols without understanding what they are saying...

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Give me a break

Post by mills » May 29th, '08, 03:22

The phrase "give me a break" almost always appears in a J-Drama. I can never quite get the hang of how it's said in Japanese. Anyone know?

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Re: Give me a break

Post by minamichan03 » May 31st, '08, 02:00

mills wrote:The phrase "give me a break" almost always appears in a J-Drama. I can never quite get the hang of how it's said in Japanese. Anyone know?
"kanbei shite yo"...
-one of my fave word... hope this helps... :-)

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Post by -shichi- » May 31st, '08, 02:58

emerica1123 wrote:It's more of just a bonus for me, but it is where I first got the idea to study Japanese.
Me too.. I first wanted to learn Japanese because of a jdrama, but now I'm learning it because I think it's an interesting language and it would be useful if I know how to speak Japanese.

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Post by Mr_Kyoling » May 31st, '08, 03:36

Funny ... I got into dorama because I wanted some real spoken language to learn from (I'd had interest in Japanese for long years before but never managed to study regularly) and got hooked.

(Btw I find it easier to learn kanji along with other sources because for me it's easiest to commit words to memory when I read and hear them in different contexts. Only the writing ... I'm too lazy.)

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Post by Zealousy » May 31st, '08, 04:18

Well, I not much into Japanese things but I want to learn Chinese. I'd probably use dramas to help my Chinese but probably not to sub until I'm confident. I think self-teaching is useless as you probably have questions on pronunciation and culture questions, I tried with Korean but it was useless on the correct way to speak. I'm planning on taking a class in September for Mandarin and then maybe in 3 years when I'm in University, I'll start Cantonese for fun.

mills
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Re: Give me a break

Post by mills » Jun 2nd, '08, 11:01

minamichan03 wrote:
mills wrote:The phrase "give me a break" almost always appears in a J-Drama. I can never quite get the hang of how it's said in Japanese. Anyone know?
"kanbei shite yo"...
-one of my fave word... hope this helps... :-)
Thank you! :cheers:

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Post by Prince of Moles » Jun 3rd, '08, 01:33

"kanben"
勘弁(かんべん)してよ

I think for most people, you just want to work on Listening, Speaking, and Reading. That alone should make learning Japanese a lot easier since you won't need to memorize how to write a lot of kanji (but you do need to be able to recognize them).

On a total side note:
Grade schoolers (6 years) learn 1006 kanji.
Middle schoolers (3 years) learn 939 kanji.

1945 kanji is the minimum necessary (this number might grow a bit in the future, the government is debating the issue).

But in practice most people know a lot more since 1) most everyone goes to high school (500-1000 more kanji) and many go on to college (# will depend on major), 2) names usually use weird kanji (300 or so).

So knowing 3500-5000 kanji is probably the ballpark estimate for a college educated Japanese these days.

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Post by burento5 » Jun 3rd, '08, 02:19

You can read about a popular Japanese test. The highest level is crazy.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kanji_kentei

You have the first 2000 kanji that will make up all the words you will ever need.
Anything above that is names, special words, historical kanji and other stuff that is rarely used.

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Post by Prince of Moles » Jun 3rd, '08, 03:05

As I said, for most people, all you really need to do is to be able to read the kanji.

I suspect that a lot of people will pass lvl 2 and many pre lvl 1 if they don't have to worry about the writing part.

Here I am guessing: but If you can read the basic set of 1945 kanji your Japanese vocabulary will probably jump to over 5,000 easily, if not 10,000. Since each kanji is a word, you know at least 2000 words (at the low ball estimate), and then you'll know or at least be able to guess the meaning of the compound words.

Which is a ton, considering that the often quoted number for the size of English language vocabulary of a college educated person is around 20,000-25,000!

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Post by mahirghari » Jun 3rd, '08, 03:42

I definitely believe I'm one of those people who would learn Japanese simply for the sake of being able to watch any and all J-dramas I want, the second the RAW comes out. I totally appreciate what all the fansub groups are doing and they are doing a tremendous job considering the countless number of j-dramas I've seen and continue to see. However, I am aware that If I were to learn the language it would come in handy in more ways than just my own leisure.

I am considering taking Japanese I next semester in college. Yet, I've heard horror stories about how terrible it can be(at least at my college). I am confident in my vocab and speaking to a certain extent due to all my drama and movie experience, however the idea of learning all the kanji seems quite intimidating. Does anyone have insight onto whether learning Kanji in a college level Japanese I class is that terrible? Also if anyone knows any easy methods to mastering kanji?

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Post by joykimlee » Jun 7th, '08, 19:59

Started learning nihongo for my interest in jdramas. But it ain't easy to learn since i prefer to put more time into watching jdramas than learning the kanas.

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minamichan03
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Post by minamichan03 » Jun 11th, '08, 00:36

Prince of Moles wrote:"kanben"
勘弁(かんべん)してよ

I think for most people, you just want to work on Listening, Speaking, and Reading. That alone should make learning Japanese a lot easier since you won't need to memorize how to write a lot of kanji (but you do need to be able to recognize them).

On a total side note:
Grade schoolers (6 years) learn 1006 kanji.
Middle schoolers (3 years) learn 939 kanji.

1945 kanji is the minimum necessary (this number might grow a bit in the future, the government is debating the issue).

But in practice most people know a lot more since 1) most everyone goes to high school (500-1000 more kanji) and many go on to college (# will depend on major), 2) names usually use weird kanji (300 or so).

So knowing 3500-5000 kanji is probably the ballpark estimate for a college educated Japanese these days.
ohh.. i'm so sorry... that "kanben" and not "kanbei"...
i work on my listening that's why this happens...

what do you think is the easiest or convenient way of learning kanji??

ferno
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Post by ferno » Jun 11th, '08, 22:06

I think that the easiest way to learn kanji aside from taking lessons like I do, is to get the raw of your favorite manga or try to read newspapers, magazines, etc. You have to make it fun and simple. For example when my Japanese teacher taugh tus how to write onna(woman) "女" she said to write it as ku-no-ichi which is a female ninja. Suffice to say that was the kanji that everyone who doesnt study kanji like I do remembers most lol. Another one is otoko(man) ”男” which combines that kanji for rice field and power respectively. Just find a way to make it fun and intersting and you will be suprised at how much kanji you will memorize. By making it fun, I have memorized over 150+ kanji and I have still have loads and loads more to learn but im learning new ones everyday. So keep at it and it will come :)

P.S this is a good website to get started http://japanese.about.com/library/blkodarchives.htm
Start at grade one and move from there. がんばって下さい :)

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minamichan03
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Post by minamichan03 » Jun 12th, '08, 14:04

anyways,do you know where i can download free japanese manga (with kanji)??

i think,mangas will really help me a lot... :-)

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morimoli
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Post by morimoli » Jun 12th, '08, 15:39

I am also learning Japanese, my goal being to move to Japan when I'm done with University.
An added bonus from learning the language is definitely being able to watch Japanese shows/movies without subtitles--I'm not quite that far yet, although I do understand a lot more with each day I study.
In the least, watching JDramas definitely insures that I'll always remember words like "Tadaima!" and "Itadakimasu!" lol

ferno
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Post by ferno » Jun 14th, '08, 18:22

A place to get manga in its RAW format(no translation) is www.mangahelpers.com

fatmouse
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Post by fatmouse » Feb 10th, '09, 06:26

I like Japan and a lot of things Japanese such as their detective drama. I did a Japanese language course at uni but still need the English subtitles.

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