POS

Numerous restaurant owners have already ridden the tide as it came— the tidal wave of Point-Of-Sale systems and similar apparatuses, for enhanced business operations through a more productive approach. And the deluge continues to dominate the foodservice industry market.

As you switch from traditional to innovative approaches towards increasing work efficiency in your restaurant, here are a few pointers to remember about POSs. Read on to know more about this reliable service from Epos Now. Add to that, what a POS system will do to and for your enterprise, most especially pertaining to Front-Of-House operations.

Before Anything Else… 

  • The Importance Of A POS Briefing And/Or Preparation Program 

A Point-of-sale system is not like most electronic gadgets designed and utilized for leisure (i.e. personal handhelds, laptops, etc.). It cannot simply be operated as one wishes and have said users learn about its functions along the way.

Definitely NOT in a restaurant setting, where customers stream in and out regularly. Learning how to operate a POS machine shouldn’t be done on the job. Not when tables are filling up and your staff are to tend to them every minute. Neither should it be learned during breaks within the day.

Call your POS system supplier and ask for assistance regarding instructing your team in the workings of said machine. These will have to be held on separate occasions, outside of your staff’s regular working schedules.

  1. Manage Security Settings 

In addition to the above, you can ask the same POS expert/s about setting up your restaurant equipment. In particular, so that financial data and other business operations-sensitive information can be secured to a T.

It is recommended that your Front-Of-House employees gain access to the device. This will be even more necessitated for systems that have portable mobile devices. They need to continually and consistently make transactions through a POS so that the execution of tasks is maintained at a balanced momentum (or faster).

Be that as it may, their access to the POSs functions should be confined within their job descriptions. Delivering work for the FOH. Everything else “financial” must be left only to you and to your employees whose responsibilities revolve around the same (i.e. bookkeeper).

This is to eliminate any chance of fraud and thievery. Finances are to be handle by key personnel whose tasks are geared towards such. And by you, the business owner. Everyone else shouldn’t be granted access to these directories.

  1. The Warm-Up 

Give your team time to get used to relying on a POS system. This will depend entirely on the size of your staff, and on how extensive their POS training is. You and your team may sit down and come up with a duration that can be counted as your “trial” for the system.

From a few days to a week, track their progress. In a different meeting, initial challenges and best practices can be shared. This way, they won’t be going back in blindly without any feedback about how to better utilize the POS, until they are able to master it considerably.

Now, For The Things A POS System Will Do For Your Resto…

  1. Transaction Speed 

This machine will heighten transaction speed. Researches show that with optimal utilization of a POS device, transactions can be accomplished at least over 50% than when employees rely exclusively on manual exercises. With proper knowledge of using the first effectively, of course.

Cash ins and outs can be finalized and recorded within the same electronic apparatus. Inventory can be analyzed side by side with that of previous records— a useful tool in checking what’s working so far and what needs to be improved on.

Likewise, your staff can get up to speed with every transaction. There’ll be less disorder on the restaurant floor, in spite of lines and tables becoming full. Everything will be seamlessly carried out, relayed to your employees from the FOH and onto the BOH, in a single go. All while said operations are being recorded.

  1. Menu Display And Prices

Contribution margins can be conveniently itemized and broken down through your point-of-sale system. This allows for smarter decisions regarding pricing, as well as smarter purchases.

Say, your well-known spaghetti is projected to have a cost above that of the industry’s, by at least %15. You may need to sit down with your team to do some re-pricing.

If it’s that you’re undercharging despite looming costs for preparation, or are overcharging when you can adjust prices for ingredients, all of these will be shown through your POS’s calculations and real-time analysis.

Should changes be put in place on your menu items, the POS software itself can implement them across the board and synchronize information related to these changes.

  1. Bestsellers And Non-Bestsellers 

Another thing your POS system will do for your restaurant is to help you gauge which items on your menu are the most “profitable”, also referred to as “bestsellers”. And which ones, not so.

When you run your own resto, it can be challenging to be less emotional and more objective. For instance, heart-warming comments about a certain menu item can make you think that that’s the bestseller. But what a POS system can do is crunch the numbers and validate if this is true, profit-wise.

The same can be done on the rest of the items that aren’t selling like hotcakes, as the saying goes. Once pointed out, make them sell like hotcakes.

  1. Upselling Can Be Done Via Your POS, Too 

…along with your FOH team, of course. Advertising and target marketing on the web is a definite must. But upselling can be done in-house, right where you get to greet your customers. Pop-ups and notifications of upsells (i.e. when customers order certain items, when orders reach a certain amount, or just for every transaction) right behind the counter. Or behind the POS mobile app.

Upselling accounts for a large portion of overall earnings. With a POS guiding your staff in doing so to and for the right customers at the right time, you may very well see an increase in profit from this category of your revenue stream.